Jump to content
johnsmith101

Thoughts on OSCommerce?

Recommended Posts

I interviewed for a job recently, and they have an OSCommerce store that they need a dev for. I'd be the sole dev. What would I be getting into, and should or should I not take it? I don't really have a high opinion of ecommerce in PHP, but it is difficult to tell how rough it would be.

Similarly, how much would you charge, minimum, for working on a osC site? I'm in the US, for perspective.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best you can define a technical business case, and after you see if osCommerce can meet the identified requiments.



Regards
-----------------------------------------
Loïc

Contact me by skype for business
Contact me @gyakutsuki for an answer on the forum

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try installing a copy and have a play. Its a five minute job to do for someone that knows what they are doing. You will then find out how deep you will be in.


REMEMBER BACKUP, BACKUP AND BACKUP

Get the latest Responsive osCommerce CE (community edition) here

It's very easy to over complicate what are simple things in life

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, johnsmith101 said:

Similarly, how much would you charge, minimum, for working on a osC site? I'm in the US, for perspective.

This is going to depend heavily on how you are working on it.  Are they hiring you on a piecework basis?  Or as an employee?  As a general rule of thumb, if you are working as a contractor, you should charge in dollars per hour the amount that you want to make in thousands per year.  So if you as a programmer would work for a salary of $100,000 a year, you should charge $100 per hour and figure on billing a thousand hours or so a year. 

As a full time employee, you would charge half that.  $50 an hour would get you $100,000 a year.  Because if you work forty hours a week for fifty weeks, that's two thousand hours a year. 

This is because as a contractor, you have to pay for things like the employer's share of FICA, health care, retirement, and other benefits yourself (because contractors are their own employers).  As an employee, your employer pays for that stuff.  Also, as a contractor, you have to spend part of your time as a salesperson, finding work.  That's unpaid work for a contractor.  As an employee, if your employer has you do that, the employer still has to pay you for your time. 

I don't think it is appropriate to get into more specific details here.  You'd be better off looking on a site like Glassdoor to find out what salaries are competitive for a PHP developer with your experience.  But hopefully this gives you a framework for thinking about how to bill.  The important thing to remember is to charge at least twice as much per hour as a contractor as you would as an employee. 


Always backup before making changes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×