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Hi there.

After a couple of days of struggling, I managed to install oscommerce-2.3.4 in an old server Ubuntu 8.4 .

The big problem was to configure everything in order to SEE the installation part while using a minilaptop with windows 7 .

After many experiments, the connections were just right, and did the installation.

BUT at the end, instead of doing the administrative part , I went to the security , turning files in mysql and ubuntu to protect, and rename files.

Now I cannot enter to the admin part in order to do the tunning up.

If someone knows about it, I would appreciate some guides.   otherwise I have to research myself again.

 

cheers, and many thanks for the software.  I hope in the future I can provide some module which I will try to do.

 

Jose

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First it sounds like you are using the wrong version. Be sure this is the one you are using. If not, start over. :ohmy:

As far as the login, I'm not sure I understand the problem but if it is do to with setting the admin login, if you empty the administrators table in the database, you will be able to set the password when you visit the admin.

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@newoldbie

13 hours ago, newoldbie said:

BUT at the end, instead of doing the administrative part , I went to the security , turning files in mysql and ubuntu to protect, and rename files.

If I may ask, what files did you rename?

M


If you are running the "official" osC 2.3.4 or 2.3.4.1 download, your installation is obsolete! Get the latest community-supported responsive "Frozen" release here

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@newoldbie

When you first install osC, it asks what directory you want to install the Admin files. To change the name of the directory after-the-fact will result in problems, as you have found out. Your installation now expects the Admin directory to be named 'Admin'.

You're going to have to edit the file /catalog/<Your Admin Directory>/includes/configure.php and change all of the references from Admin to your renamed directory.

M


If you are running the "official" osC 2.3.4 or 2.3.4.1 download, your installation is obsolete! Get the latest community-supported responsive "Frozen" release here

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Hi M.

I can do rerename back to admin.

I also have to get permissions out of 777 right.

many thanks. Not today as I am busy. later on. jose

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You don't ever want 777 permissions, if you can help it. Long ago, when you could trust everyone sharing your system, 777 was harmless. However, it opens the doors wide for anyone sharing your server (and sometimes, people coming in through the web interface) to look at and change files. It's basically turning security off. Anyone telling you first thing to "change all permissions to 777" is an idiot and you should avoid them. In some extreme cases, with a poorly configured server, PHP may be running as "other" or "world" and you may need to chmod 777 (world writable) on selected directories so that PHP can write to them (temporarily or even permanently), but those cases should be few and far between. Some systems may even still require PHP files to be marked "executable" (7 instead of 6) but that's rare. Start with the most restrictive permissions you can (usually 644 for files and 755 for directories), and loosen permissions as needed for the system to function.

By the way, if you're running your own server to save money, without professional expertise, be assured that hackers know far more about security exploits than you ever will. It's false economy, as you will be hacked. And it's worse with ecommerce, because real money is involved.


If you are running the "official" osC 2.3.4 or 2.3.4.1 download, your installation is obsolete! Get (stable) Frozen or (unstable) Edge. See also the naming convention and the latest community-supported responsive "Edge" release

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On 6/21/2018 at 8:26 AM, MrPhil said:

You don't ever want 777 permissions, if you can help it. Long ago, when you could trust everyone sharing your system, 777 was harmless. However, it opens the doors wide for anyone sharing your server (and sometimes, people coming in through the web interface) to look at and change files. It's basically turning security off. Anyone telling you first thing to "change all permissions to 777" is an idiot and you should avoid them. In some extreme cases, with a poorly configured server, PHP may be running as "other" or "world" and you may need to chmod 777 (world writable) on selected directories so that PHP can write to them (temporarily or even permanently), but those cases should be few and far between. Some systems may even still require PHP files to be marked "executable" (7 instead of 6) but that's rare. Start with the most restrictive permissions you can (usually 644 for files and 755 for directories), and loosen permissions as needed for the system to function.

By the way, if you're running your own server to save money, without professional expertise, be assured that hackers know far more about security exploits than you ever will. It's false economy, as you will be hacked. And it's worse with ecommerce, because real money is involved.

 

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