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Who in the EU has heard of GDPR and will it affect you

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14 hours ago, wHiTeHaT said:

your code can be on the market for £25

Looking good Henry. :thumbsup:

Dan

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We did spend quite some time adapting. We bought a GDPR-software which had several templates. Everything from incoming orders, handling, newsletters and storage of data have been described thoroughly. The software certainly made it quicker to become compliant. 

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https://www.business2community.com/cybersecurity/gdpr-2-0-comes-to-the-united-states-02092832

GDPR 2.0 Comes to the United States

On June 28 2018, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law AB 375, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) of 2018. The statute, seen as one of the toughest privacy laws in the United States, will require companies to tell California residents what information is being collected and how it’s used. You have 18 months to get ready.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

For organizations already actively complying with the requirements of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the CCPA will have little impact. You are already doing what you need to do to comply, as the California statute’s intent is very similar to GDPR. The goal of both of these laws — and the Australian Privacy Principles — is to give consumers ownership and control of their personal data. And it provides the legal bite to ensure compliance.

If your US-based organization, however, has not started or believes that the GDPR will not have an impact on your local business, the new law is more than a wake up call, it’s your fire alarm. And where California goes, many other states will follow.

The new law will more than likely require a thorough review of your data security controls or risk expensive litigation and fines.

Here’s a quick look at the highlights:

  • California’s Attorney General’s office will have the authority to enforce the law when it goes into effect in January 2020.
  • It has provisions for allowing people to tell companies to delete or stop selling their information.
  • The law does not force companies to stop collecting information OR provide provisions for consumers to request companies stop collecting their information.
  • Like the GDPR, the California law has a broad definition of PII (IP addresses, geo-location and browsing info [cookies])
  • The California law has an exception for personal information “de-identified or in the aggregate consumer information;” however, the law doesn’t give much detail on the identifiers that are not subject to scrutiny.
    • Aggregation of information might also be an alternative way for advertisers to ignore the law.

With 18 months to enforcement, companies need to start today. Most companies focused on security and compliance already maintain formalized incident response, disaster recovery/business continuity plans as well as comply with encryption/data anonymization for sensitive data storage and have gone through at least a rudimentary data-mapping process that should easily surpass the California requirements. If that isn’t the case for your organization, implement the GDPR methodologies and processes to comply with the CCPA and you will be set for any eventuality.


If you are running the "official" osC 2.3.4 or 2.3.4.1 download, your installation is obsolete! Get the latest community-supported responsive "Edge" release here

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Nice!  When I first heard about GDPR I was "bloody EU meddling bas---- bureaucrats".  Since it came into force, I've got my details removed from numerous sites with no questions asked.   

So, good for California - what you guys will see is some resistance from Shopowners to the whole idea, then when it comes these shopowners will realise "hey that was easy".  And when it is in force...most "Joe Average" will find it useful.  And yes, I agree...what one state does...the rest will follow.


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Get the latest current code (community-supported responsive 2.3.4.1BS Edge) here

 

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Well then, applications such as osCommerce should be GDPR/CCPA ready right out of the box, with all the places explaining what the site does with your data ready to be filled in (or customized), and all the tools in place for customers to make requests and manage their data. Not add-ons -- built right in, as it will be needed almost everywhere.


If you are running the "official" osC 2.3.4 or 2.3.4.1 download, your installation is obsolete! Get the latest community-supported responsive "Edge" release

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Adding stuff in is not the way forward.  The way forward is modular.


This is a signature that appears on all my posts.  
IF YOU MAKE A POST REQUESTING HELP...please state the exact version
of osCommerce that you are using. THANKS

 
Get the latest current code (community-supported responsive 2.3.4.1BS Edge) here

 

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I don't care what form it takes, so long as it's not something that a store owner has to go looking for and install separately. Turning it on manually is OK, but it has to be built in. Any store software that has it built in is going to have a major advantage over all others where it's an "extra" afterthought, because almost everyone is going to have to use it.


If you are running the "official" osC 2.3.4 or 2.3.4.1 download, your installation is obsolete! Get the latest community-supported responsive "Edge" release

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I'm 100% sure that things will be removed from Core, in order to make it;

  1. easier for "Team" (hahaha) to support
  2. easier for coders to code new stuff
  3. easier for shopowners to have a choice of what they want

I can't imagine any scenario where osCommerce gets more things added.

As for GDPR things:

  • There is already a very good GDPR system available for these (as you put them) "business people who don't want to be computer wizards" .

This is a signature that appears on all my posts.  
IF YOU MAKE A POST REQUESTING HELP...please state the exact version
of osCommerce that you are using. THANKS

 
Get the latest current code (community-supported responsive 2.3.4.1BS Edge) here

 

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But where would the legal stuff stop. GDPR, Taxes, VAT and all the different legal rules from every country,  the code would be a nightmare. May be there should be a package available for each country, similar to the concept of a language pack, that would include all the legal stuff for all the countries, all as modules. Each pack could them be maintained by someone with an interest and knowledge of the laws in each countries. Each pack could also contain things like currencies set up, date and address layouts, and so much more, but it will take lots of organising and will soon become a headache,and would get left and then become outdated because only a few people would want it, and others couldnt be bothered to update things as needed. It would become a mess like many other addons. It would also mean more work in altering the core code to allow these things to be added as a package.

The only trouble being this will never happen as no one can access the core code, and without help Gary cant do everything on his own.


REMEMBER BACKUP, BACKUP AND BACKUP

Before installing the official version of oscommerce first look at a responsive version here

I have not failed. I've just found thousands of ways that won't work.

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Politicians flip & flop all the time, It would be a nightmare keeping it up to date with every change! Also giving league advice in the core or as an add-on is not wise as it would open OsC to legal complications. Its best people get advice from own local legal experts so there is no comeback on OsC. People should be getting there T&S and other stuff legally check anyway.

I would definitely keep it out of core.


I'm using the cutting Edge v2.3.4.1 CE:thumbsup::smile:

Get the latest osCommerce Online Merchant Community Bootstrap Edition v2.3.4.1 CE

 

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