Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

No-idea

1475 people looked in two weeks but no sales :(

Recommended Posts

Hello all!

 

I have made my first website thanx to the help of many people on here! Its been a slow process and I'm still tweaking the setup.

 

Phoenix Factory

 

I have had 1475 people visit my site but no one has purchased anything :(

 

Its such a shame as I've been working so hard to get it going.

 

Can anyone see if theres something really blatent putting people off or am I just a slow starter :D lol

 

Any comments welcome!

 

Cheers

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For starters, there's nothing to set your site apart from the gazillions of others out there. Consider customizing your shop to give it some personality.

 

Two things that would deter me immediately:

 

1. Your returns policy hasn't been changed. I'm not too likely to buy from a store that tells me to "Put here your Shipping & Returns information." :)

 

2. Contact Us page is only an Email form. If it weren't for the fact that your prices are in GBPs, I'd have no clue where you're located. You've offered no other means to contact you besides that form, which I would suspect may not be replied to, given the lack of info elsewhere. I still don't know where you ship to. Do you allow orders from outside the UK? Info please!

 

3. Terms and conditions are pretty useless. It talks about your Phoenix Factory logo being copyrighted. Do your customers care? Tell them what terms and conditions apply to them. If you want an idea of what kind of stuff to include there, take a look at my site (or any others that have the area filled in).

 

http://www.kididdles.com/catalog/conditions.php

 

That may give you a start on why you're not converting customers to

sales.

 

HTH,

 

Terry


Terry Kluytmans

 

Contribs Installed: Purchase Without Account (PWA); Big Images, Product Availability, Description in Product Listing, Graphical Infobox, Header Tags Controller, Login Box, Option Type Feature, plus many layout changes & other mods of my own, like:

 

Add order total to checkout_shipment

Add order total to checkout_payment

Add radio buttons at checkout_shipping (for backorder options, etc.)

Duplicate Table Rate Shipping Module

Better Product Review Flow

 

* If at first you don't succeed, find out if there's a prize for the loser. *

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have had 1475 people visit my site but no one has purchased anything :(

 

 

 

I'm not sure who's bright idea it was to put a "click" counter in the footer of the OSC pages, but it is very misleading. Everytime you visit your own site and click a bunch of page the number goes up...

 

Its not unique users. Divide that number by 10 and you'll have a more accurate number of visitors.


I need to read the rules more often...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think there must be perhaps 20,000 Stores using osCommerce right now (that's very much a guesstimate). Of those;

 

2% - people with highly modified Stores

25% - people with somewhat modified stores

40% - people who have made some stylesheet changes

20% - people who have added a logo at the top

13% - people who have installed osCommerce and left it as is.

 

I'm not saying that a highly modified shop will sell more than a standard install. And vice versa. But it stands to reason that a Store Owner who takes the time to give his customers a shopping experience that they won't forget will do better than a Store Owner who doesn't.

 

You can easily give your Store a new look - there's at least 10 templates that you can instantly upload in the contributions section. Then there's the STS and the BTS (but I wouldn't recommend going down that route. Then there's the few commercial vendors who sell Templates.

 

So, my advice would be to give your Store a better look - yours is instantly forgettable. Maybe this would help your sales.


This is a signature that appears on all my posts.  
IF YOU MAKE A POST REQUESTING HELP...please state the exact version
of osCommerce that you are using. THANKS

 
Get the latest Responsive osCommerce CE (community edition) here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Give it time. It took about a year and a half before mine really hit. I'm now picked up by a lot of search engines. I also did a alot of phone calls to friends to get the word out, visited user websites related to my site and PM'd, IM'd them on message boards, etc.

 

You can't expect to throw up a website and expect sales out the yin yang. It just won't happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two weeks is nothing--you'll need at least six months of strong marketing to get off the ground.

 

In addition to all the valid comments above, your product line is all over the map: electronics, trade & promotion discounts, wedding accessories, baseball caps...good lord. I'm sure there are reasons behind your products selection, but it does not convey a sense of expertise to your customer. If I'm going to buy electronics, I'll go to somebody who knows that business--not somebody who also hawks them alongside baseball hats. Building a business image is more than picking a nice color scheme and fancy logo-- identity comes from focus, passion, and commitment. Even Amazon started with a focus--and people still associate them with books.

 

Attention to detail also inspires confidence:

 

"We are am established company..."

"Personal Saftey"

"If your unsure..."

 

Best wishes.


"Buy the ticket, take the ride..." -HST

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly! Work in one category, don't sell like a conveniece store. I would never walk into a 7-11 and buy my cell phone service there even though they offer it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Exactly!  Work in one category, don't sell like a conveniece store.  I would never walk into a 7-11 and buy my cell phone service there even though they offer it.

 

 

I agree to an extent - that extent being limited by the amount of after service care the products you sell require - If your product range requires little or no after sales service - then mixing product lines is a valid business strategy - in bricks and mortar too many names to mention do this successfully all the time.

 

If you need dedicated and complex after sales service - then specialism is I grant you the way to go - but even here witness the zaibatsu of Japan post WW2 that led to the massive industrial growth of that country and the conglomerates of S. Korea that went into hi tech stuff ranging from oil tankers to mp3 players -

 

Good advice above but needs caveats methinks

 

Charles


A kite flies highest AGAINST the wind !

 

"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, a lover in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming ~ WOO HOO!! What a ride!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree to an extent - that extent being limited by the amount of after service care the products you sell require - If your product range requires little or no after sales service - then mixing product lines is a valid business strategy - in bricks and mortar too many names to mention do this successfully all the time.

 

If you need dedicated and complex after sales service - then specialism is I grant you the way to go - but even here witness the zaibatsu of Japan post WW2 that led to the massive industrial growth of that country and the conglomerates of S. Korea that went into hi tech stuff ranging from oil tankers to mp3 players -

 

Good advice above but needs caveats methinks

 

Charles

 

 

This is the way I see it. WalMart sells everything. I would trust buying electronics or office furniture off their site. Now go to an unknown website that you absolutely know nothing about. Would you buy the same things or would you buy from an unknown website that specializes in one genre.

 

I sell one genere because I am unknown and I compete in pricing with two big nationwide companies. I am by no means hitting a pot of gold but I am able to match their price with a low profit margin and charging no S&H whereas the other two are. Right now I'm in good with the search engines ... well maybe if I explain how I do it, it will help those who read this post.

 

 

I am selling certain type of products that relate to each other (example, hair brushes, I sell all kinds)

 

Competitor A and B sells the same sh!t.

 

Well Competitor A and B charges S&H.

 

I match Competitor A and B and don't charge S&H.

 

Even though my profit margin is hella lower I am hoping that word of mouth will expand business. How can I live off of a low profit margin? I work another job as a pimp and a porn star hence the name John Holmes.

 

Is it working? Yes. I can type just about anything that relate to the products I sell and I am listed at least on the first page.

 

How do I know?

 

The important hacks to use are, that I think, Visitor Web Stats and Recover Carts and 'How Did You Hear About Us'.

 

 

Ok, this is very important. It is very important to add the Manufacturer when you add a new product. It is very important to add some product description to the title and it is very important to add an image and important to add a product description.

 

i.e.

 

ADD A NEW PRODUCT

 

I would sell Dr. Scholl's sh!t so I when I add a new product, I add the mfg Dr. Scholls from the drop down. For the title I say "Dr. Scholls Fine Line Hair Comb". For the description, I put down let's say "dr. Scholl's 2005 introduction comb that brushes anything from coarse leg hair to soft fine armpit hair." add the part number too.

 

Now the search engines actually to pick up the mfg, the mfg in the title and the part number.

 

When I go to VWS and look at clicks, I noticed that someone will have come to my site via a click. I look at the click and click there and it takes me to the search engine and the keywords they typed in. Say they typed in Part number "123 Dr. Scholl's" and I don't sell 123 but sell 234 part number. Well, the search engine picked up "Dr. Scholl's" so the user came to my site. From that info I know they were looking for '234', so i add the part '234' to my site and stock it.

 

I do that for every single click, and it's hella hard work but it's worked for me. so the next pimp wannabe that types in "234 dr. scholls" comes to my site and i have it. since i can't ask everyone what they are looking for, i go by the clicks initially and lose the first sale since i don't carry it but now that i know, i'll get the second click and a sell now that i added it.

 

RC is very important too. When I see a cart that has been sitting there for a couple days, I email and ask why. I always get a response and it's either from, "well i don't have money" then i offer a discount. "well i don't wanna enter my cc info online" so i call the people up and get it thru the phone".

 

"how did you hear about us" very important because when they enter "other" and manually type where they came from, i go to that site. if that site has a message board, i register and post and see what people are looking for and PM them my site.

 

 

2003 sales were only 900 bucks, i started late half of the year. 2004, sales was 12K, 2005 as of feb 22, sales is 8K. so sales have increased. profit is 10 percent, you do the math. i am picked up by msn, google, yahoo alot and i know this by VWS. I also look at Who's Online Enhancement 1.5b and see the bots adding product to their carts.

 

this method of madness has worked for the pimp John Holmes.

 

BTW, i do not sell combs. :)

 

I can expand further on my madness if you like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello all :D

 

 

Thank you for your kind replys! As I said its my first shop so I'm not 100% or things.

 

Is it possible for somone to give me a link to themes that don't require mysql modification?

 

I had been meaning to update the postage page but totally forgot and the policy and privacy pages I didn't really know what to put but I will update this.

 

I will also add a about us page with moe information on. How do I go about adding a blank page that would appear by the postage information?

 

Thanx again people and I recieved my first paypal order this evening :D wahoo!

 

Heehee cheers

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree to an extent - that extent being limited by the amount of after service care the products you sell require - If your product range requires little or no after sales service - then mixing product lines is a valid business strategy - in bricks and mortar too many names to mention do this successfully all the time.

 

If you need dedicated and complex after sales service - then specialism is I grant you the way to go - but even here witness the zaibatsu of Japan post WW2 that led to the massive industrial growth of that country and the conglomerates of S. Korea that went into hi tech stuff ranging from oil tankers to mp3 players -

 

Good advice above but needs caveats methinks

 

Charles

 

You're right, caveats are in order. Mixing product lines can be a great business strategy (emphasis on strategy, which we hope does actually exist...). :P

 

I can't speak for other lines of business--but in computers/electronics, there are more benefits to industry dedication than being able to offer after-sales service. For pre-sales Q&A (everybody has questions) you still gotta talk the talk--to noobs, experienced techs, and everybody in between. Then there is sourcing, always a challenge. If you don't know the industry, you're not going to be able to get good products at the best prices (more likely you'll wind up with a shelf full of last year's model...). Not to mention issues of sales volume--who wants to supply a part-time retailer who moves two units a month? But hey, maybe that's just us.

 

I could be wrong, but I don't think zaibatsu/keiretsu are as much about mixing product lines at the retail level as about the interlocking of industrial enterprises and finance. Yikes! :ph34r:

 

Walmart. :x


"Buy the ticket, take the ride..." -HST

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×